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dc.contributor.authorMoreno, Lorena
dc.contributor.authorBriñol, Pablo
dc.contributor.authorPetty, Richard E.
dc.contributor.otherUAM. Departamento de Psicología Social y Metodologíaes_ES
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-11T11:44:13Z
dc.date.available2022-03-11T11:44:13Z
dc.date.issued2021-09-09
dc.identifier.citationMetacognition and Learning (2021): 1-27en_US
dc.identifier.issn1556-1631es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10486/700654
dc.description.abstractThe present research examined the role of metacognitive confidence in understanding to what extent people’s valenced thoughts guide their performance in academic settings. First, students were asked to engage in positive or negative thinking about exams in their major area of study (Study 1) or about themselves (Studies 2 and 3). The valence of these primary cognitions was manipulated to be positive or negative. Furthermore, a metacognitive variable, the perceived validity of the primary cognitions, was measured or varied to be relatively high or low. Finally, performance was assessed using a knowledge test (Study 1), a geometric shapes task (Study 2) or a selection of questions from the Graduate Record Examination (Study 3). In accordance with self-validation theory, we predicted and found that metacognitive confidence (relative to doubt) increased the impact of primary cognitions on performance. When thoughts were positive, increased confidence in the primary cognitions improved performance. However, when thoughts were negative, the same confidence validated the negative primary cognitions and reduced performance. Thus, metacognitive confidence can lead to opposite findings on performance depending on whether it validates performance-relevant positive thoughts or negative thoughts. Variations in the perceived validity of thoughts mediated the obtained effects. Therefore, we conclude that understanding the process of thought validation can help in specifying why and when metacognitive confidence is likely to work or to backfire in producing the desired performance effectsen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipResearch was supported by the Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación y Universidades, Gobierno de España (ES) [PSI2017-83303-C2-1-P] Grant to Pablo Briñolen_US
dc.format.extent27 pag.es_ES
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfes_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherSpringeres_ES
dc.relation.ispartofMetacognition and Learningen_US
dc.rights© 2021 by the authorsen_US
dc.subject.otherAcademic performanceen_US
dc.subject.otherConfidenceen_US
dc.subject.otherMetacognitionen_US
dc.subject.otherPrimary and secondary cognitionsen_US
dc.subject.otherThoughtsen_US
dc.titleMetacognitive confidence can increase but also decrease performance in academic settingsen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.subject.ecienciaPsicologíaes_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s11409-021-09270-yes_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11409-021-09270-yes_ES
dc.identifier.publicationfirstpage1es_ES
dc.identifier.publicationlastpage27es_ES
dc.relation.projectIDGobierno de España. PSI2017-83303-C2-1-Pes_ES
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionen
dc.rights.ccReconocimientoes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccesses_ES
dc.authorUAMMoreno Díez, Lorena María (325203)
dc.authorUAMBriñol Turnes, Pablo Antonio (259070)
dc.facultadUAMFacultad de Psicologíaes_ES


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