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dc.contributor.authorKaye, Linda K.
dc.contributor.authorRodríguez Cuadrado, Sara 
dc.contributor.authorMalone, Stephanie A.
dc.contributor.authorWall, Helen J.
dc.contributor.authorGaunt, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorAshleigh, L. Mulvey
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Charlotte
dc.contributor.otherUAM. Departamento de Psicología Evolutiva y de la Educaciónes_ES
dc.date.accessioned2022-10-05T18:01:08Z
dc.date.available2022-10-05T18:01:08Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationComputers in Human Behavior 116 (2021) 106648es_ES
dc.identifier.issn0747-5632es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10486/704399
dc.description.abstractEmoji are vastly becoming an integral part of everyday communication, yet little is understood about the extent to which these are processed emotionally. Previous research shows that there is a processing advantage for emotionally-valenced words over neutral ones, therefore if emoji are indeed emotional, one could expect an quivalent processing advantage. In the Pilot Study, participants (N = 44) completed a lexical decision task to explore accuracy and response latency of word, face and emoji stimuli. This stimuli varied in emotional valence (positive vs. neutral). Main effects were found for stimuli type and valence on both accuracy and latency, although the interaction for accuracy was not significant. That is, there were processing advantages of positively valenced stimuli over neutral ones, across all stimuli types. Also, faces and emoji were processed significantly more quickly than words, and latencies between face and emoji stimuli, irrespective of valence were largely equivalent. The Main Study recruited 33 participants to undertake a modified and extended version of the lexical decision task, which included three valence conditions (positive, negative and neutral) per stimuli type. Although no main effects were found for accuracy, there was a significant main effect found for stimuli but not for valence on latency. Namely, that word stimuli irrespective of valence were processed significantly more slowly than face or emoji stimuli. There was not a significant interaction between stimuli and valence, however. Therefore, overall although there was partial support for a processing advantage of emoji stimuli, this was not replicated across the studies reported here, suggesting additional work may be needed to corroborate further evidencees_ES
dc.format.extent8 págs.es_ES
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfes_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherElsevieres_ES
dc.relation.ispartofComputers in Human Behaviores_ES
dc.subject.otherEmojies_ES
dc.subject.otherEmotional valencees_ES
dc.subject.otherLexical decisiones_ES
dc.subject.otherFaceses_ES
dc.subject.otherWordses_ES
dc.titleHow emotional are emoji?: Exploring the effect of emotional valence on the processing of emoji stimulies_ES
dc.typearticlees_ES
dc.subject.ecienciaDeporteses_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2020.106648es_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chb.2020.106648es_ES
dc.identifier.publicationfirstpage196648-1es_ES
dc.identifier.publicationlastpage196648-8es_ES
dc.identifier.publicationvolume116es_ES
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones_ES
dc.rights.ccReconocimientoes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccesses_ES
dc.facultadUAMDepartamentos Interfacultativoses_ES
dc.facultadUAMFacultad de Formación de Profesorado y Educaciónes_ES


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