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dc.contributor.authorHortas Rico, Miriam 
dc.contributor.authorRios, Vicente
dc.contributor.otherUAM. Departamento de Economía y Hacienda Públicaes_ES
dc.date.accessioned2022-12-15T14:37:35Z
dc.date.available2022-12-15T14:37:35Z
dc.date.issued2019-09-09
dc.identifier.citationRegional Studies 54.7 (2020): 958 - 973en_US
dc.identifier.issn0034-3404 (print)en_US
dc.identifier.issn1360-0591 (online)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10486/705630
dc.descriptionThis is an Accepted Manuscript version of the following article, accepted for publication in Regional Studies 54.7 (2020): 958 - 973. It is deposited under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly citeden_US
dc.description.abstractThe paper presents a framework for determining the optimal size of local jurisdictions and whether it varies depending on the geographical heterogeneity of the territory. To that aim, it first develops a theoretical model of cost efficiency that takes into account spatial interactions and spillover effects among neighbouring jurisdictions. The model solution leads to a spatial Durbin panel data specification of local spending as a non-linear function of population size. The model is tested using a large local data set over the period 2003–11 for an aggregate measure of public spending. The empirical findings suggest a ‘U’-shaped relationship between population size and the costs of providing public services. A second step investigates the role of geographical characteristics such as elevation and terrain ruggedness in the determination of the optimal jurisdiction size. The results reveal that optimal city size decreases with elevation and increases with ruggednessen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad (Spain) [grant number ECO2016-76681-R]en_US
dc.format.extent35 págs.es_ES
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen_US
dc.relation.ispartofRegional Studiesen_US
dc.rights© 2020 Taylor and Francisen_US
dc.subject.otheroptimal government sizeen_US
dc.subject.otherSpanish municipalitiesen_US
dc.subject.otherspatial panelsen_US
dc.subject.othertopographyen_US
dc.titleIs there an optimal size for local governments? A spatial panel data model approachen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.subject.ecienciaEconomíaes_ES
dc.date.embargoend2021-03-09
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.1080/00343404.2019.1648786es_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00343404.2019.1648786es_ES
dc.identifier.publicationfirstpage958es_ES
dc.identifier.publicationissue7es_ES
dc.identifier.publicationlastpage973es_ES
dc.identifier.publicationvolume54es_ES
dc.relation.projectIDGobierno de España. ECO2016-76681-Res_ES
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersiones_ES
dc.rights.ccReconocimiento – NoComerciales_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccesses_ES
dc.facultadUAMFacultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresarialeses_ES


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