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dc.contributor.authorMartín Azcarate, Francisco 
dc.contributor.authorAlameda-Martín, Aitor
dc.contributor.authorEscudero, Adrián
dc.contributor.authorSánchez, Ana M.
dc.contributor.otherUAM. Departamento de Ecologíaes_ES
dc.date.accessioned2022-12-19T09:29:13Z
dc.date.available2022-12-19T09:29:13Z
dc.date.issued2021-03-16
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Ecology and Evolution 9 (2021): 619215es_ES
dc.identifier.issn2296-701X (online)es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10486/705687
dc.description.abstractNatural and seminatural habitat remnants play a crucial ecological role in intensified agroecosystems. Assumptions on the conservation value of small and poorly connected fragments in a hostile matrix come from generalization obtained from a limited number of taxa, mostly plants, and vertebrates. To date, few studies have analyzed the effect of fragmentation on ant communities in Mediterranean agroecosystems, despite the importance of this group of animals on several key ecosystem functions and services. Here, we analyze the effects of fragment area and connectivity on ant communities in gypsum outcrops in a large cereal agroecosystem of Central Spain. Ant communities were described by their species composition, abundance (total number of occurrences), and number of species, standardized both by area (species density), and abundance (species richness). Observed number of species was relatively high in comparison with other studies in the Mediterranean, and we found no effects of fragment characteristics on species density, species richness and species composition, which implies that even small and isolated patches do have a value for ant conservation. Moreover, total number of occurrences were higher for smaller and more isolated fragments. This finding contrasts with the results reported for other taxa in similar gypsum habitats and suggests that certain ant traits and strategies make them particularly resistant to fragmentation and capable to take advantage of small habitat patches. Given the important ecological role played by ants, we recommend the preservation of these small habitat fragments in the management plans of agroecosystems in these drylands, especially in those cases in which intensification of agricultural practices greatly diminish natural habitat availabilityes_ES
dc.format.extent10 pag.es_ES
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfes_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherFrontiers Mediaes_ES
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Ecology and Evolutiones_ES
dc.rights© 2021 Azcárate, Alameda-Martín, Escudero and Sánchezes_ES
dc.subject.otherAntses_ES
dc.subject.otherBiodiversityes_ES
dc.subject.otherCrematogasteres_ES
dc.titleAnt Communities Resist Even in Small and Isolated Gypsum Habitat Remnants in a Mediterranean Agroecosystemes_ES
dc.typearticlees_ES
dc.subject.ecienciaBiología y Biomedicina / Biologíaes_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.3389/fevo.2021.619215es_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fevo.2021.619215es_ES
dc.identifier.publicationfirstpage619215-1es_ES
dc.identifier.publicationlastpage619215-10es_ES
dc.identifier.publicationvolume9es_ES
dc.relation.projectIDComunidad de Madrid. S2018/EMT-4338/REMEDINAL TE-CMes_ES
dc.relation.projectIDinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020/724704/EU//HIGCCes_ES
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones_ES
dc.rights.ccReconocimientoes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccesses_ES
dc.facultadUAMFacultad de Cienciases_ES
dc.institutoUAMCentro de Investigación en Biodiversidad y Cambio Global (CIBC-UAM)es_ES


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